Quinceanera Dresses and Customs Vary By Country

Quinceanera Dresses and Customs Vary By Country

Quinceanera gowns from JasmineQuinceanera dresses have special meaning in a woman’s life — it’s the gorgeous gown she wears while sharing her fabulous fifteenth birthday with friends and family. It’s a celebration of her transition from childhood to maturity. The celebration is primarily a Latin American tradition, but the customs any particular family incorporates into their Quinceanera gowns and events often have their roots in the family’s origin. If you’re unsure of what customs you’d like to incorporate into your upcoming Quinceanera, we have provided some common customs from different regions of Latin America, as well as some more Americanized traditions.
  • Traditionally from almost every Latin American region, Quinceaneras open with Mass or some type of religious ceremony.
  • Called the Fiesta de Quince in Uruguay, Argentina and Paraguay, the new 15-year-old looking beautiful in her formal gown enters with her father. There are three or more rounds of dancing throughout the event and a meal is served. During the cake cutting, a toast is given to the woman of the day and her female friends and relatives pull a ribbon out of a bunch, each of which has a charm except for one that has a ring.
  • The Ceremony of 15 Candles is an optional part of Quinceanera ceremonies in Argentina and other countries. The teenager takes 15 candles and gives one to each of the 15 people present who have most influenced her life. This is considered a gracious way to thank the people who supported her, and variations on this ceremony could include items other than candles.
  • Brazil calls the 15th birthday celebration Festa de Debutante, Baile de Debutante or Festa de Quinze Anos. Similar to the Argentinian ceremony, there are several periods of dancing to both international and national music, and a video is often shown with pictures and home movies of the teen’s life up to that point. There is also a dancing segment that pairs the teen with men from her family and one other boy, which is often a good friend or boyfriend.
  • Mexican Quinceanera traditions are some of the most common in California, including Eureka. Mexico’s custom for Quinceanera dresses is very prevalent in the styles we see, which is usually formal evening dresses and ball gowns. Pink used to be the preferred color for the teen to wear, but now more traditional Quinceanera gowns are white. The Mexican tradition also includes a court of honor for the young woman made up of 14 paired off girls and boys. She is often given a rosary that depicts the Virgin of Guadalupe, the patron saint of Mexico.
There are several customs specific to each country and even regions within these countries, so there is plenty to choose from if you are unsure what to include. Quinceaneras are an important part of recognizing a woman’s maturity. If you need help finding the perfect dress and you want to try them on in-store, come to Promises Bridal and Formal Wear in the Henderson Center or check out what we have online in our Quinceanera dresses section.
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